Brian May Astrophysics Thesis

Brian May Astrophysics Thesis-25
Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission.The content is provided for information purposes only.May's thesis documents the building of a pressure-scanned Fabry-Perot Spectrometer, equipped with a photomultiplier and pulse-counting electronics, and its deployment at the Observatorio del Teide at Izaña in Tenerife, at an altitude of 7,700 feet (2,567 m), to record high-resolution spectra of the Zodiacal Light.

Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission.The content is provided for information purposes only.May's thesis documents the building of a pressure-scanned Fabry-Perot Spectrometer, equipped with a photomultiplier and pulse-counting electronics, and its deployment at the Observatorio del Teide at Izaña in Tenerife, at an altitude of 7,700 feet (2,567 m), to record high-resolution spectra of the Zodiacal Light.

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May was an astrophysics student at Imperial College when he joined Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor to form Queen in 1970, but dropped his doctorate as the glam rock band became successful.

Queen became one of Britain’s biggest music groups in the 1970s, with hits including “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “We Will Rock You.” After Mercury’s 1991 death, May produced two solo albums, the latest of which, “Another World,” appeared in 1998.

May began his research of the Zodiacal Light in 1970 and completed his research and thesis in 2007, following a 30-year hiatus to play guitar in the well-known rock band Queen.

While some readers may expect a rock-and-roll guitarist to write a popular astronomy book, A Survey of Radial Velocities in the Zodiacal Dust Cloud is a rigorous, academic examination of the Zodiacal Light.

May will be formally presented with his doctorate next May.

Guitarist and songwriter Brian May has completed his doctorate in astrophysics — three decades after he put academia on hold to form the rock group Queen.By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers. But the guitarist continued to pursue his out-of-this-world interests — and last year co-authored a book titled “Bang!The Complete History of the Universe.” He told reporters Thursday that handing over his completed thesis — a 48,000 word study which seeks to prove planets and dust clouds in our solar system orbit in the same direction — and facing examiners for a review of his work was a tough challenge.The rocker was awarded his his Ph D this week by London’s Imperial College and said submitting his thesis, “Radial Velocities in the Zodiacal Dust Cloud,” to supervisors was as nerve-racking as any stadium gig.“I’m feeling rather joyful.I cannot tell you how much of a weight off the mind it is,” May said.The candidate was of course their lead guitarist, Brian May.Despite his success as a rock musician, Brian has continued his interest in astronomy, and last year co-authored, with Sir Patrick Moore and Chris Lintott, a popular science book entitled BANG! He had mentioned in public that it was always a matter of regret that he hadnt finished his Ph D in astronomy, but recently he had the opportunity to do just that, and he has spent the last year or so reviewing the field and putting his original work into an up-to-date context.But the guitarist continued to pursue his out-of-this-world interests.His thesis was a 48,000-word study that seeks to prove planets and dust clouds in our solar system orbit in the same direction.

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